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Life Cycles

2019  

Life Cycles

2019  



Drawing Circles


Life cycles was made in 2019 and is the most recent output from Paalu.

Life Cycles drew inspiration from Ray Dalio’s books about debt cycles and principles.

One of the books contains nifty illustrations of the nature of growth and drawbacks in economies.

But he also uses the same idea to illustrate the nature of personal development.

The illustration is an exponential line consisting of several curls, symbolizing a bigger picture of life where each curl signifies a period in life where things go up, then down.

What Ray Dalio means by the rising curly line is that life has its ups and downs, but is really going upwards in the bigger picture.

You can make up your mind about how Paalu thinks his life progresses in ‘Life Cycles’.

 

The images within the bubbles are not arranged chronologically according to Paalu’s life.

Paalu wanted to manifest the idea of a cyclical lifetime, which is not necessarily arranged in the biological course of life where you are born, grow up to be an adolescent, get a partner, birth children, raise them, get old, die, and so on.
He thought the cyclical arrangement could be a display of the inner cycles, with no attachment to time but a connection to something more important.


The photographs used for life cycles are (as usual) taken from Paalu’s photo albums — yet this time, the photographs incite a wide range of actual emotions, real relationships, and true experiences.

This time he doesn’t bring you inside his head; he welcomes you to his life.

Life Cycles is undoubtedly his most personal piece yet, since the ghouls and psychosomatic expressions are put away, giving us a novel glimpse outside of his mind.

Yet his choice of material may also reflect that he is entering a new cycle where he lets go of his demons — whereas what remains is his vivid stars, intricate chaos, and himself.

Life cycles was made in 2019 and is the most recent output from Paalu.

Life Cycles drew inspiration from Ray Dalio’s books about debt cycles and principles.

One of the books contains nifty illustrations of the nature of growth and drawbacks in economies.

But he also uses the same idea to illustrate the nature of personal development.

The illustration is an exponential line consisting of several curls, symbolizing a bigger picture of life where each curl signifies a period in life where things go up, then down.

What Ray Dalio means by the rising curly line is that life has its ups and downs, but is really going upwards in the bigger picture.

You can make up your mind about how Paalu thinks his life progresses in ‘Life Cycles’.

 

The images within the bubbles are not arranged chronologically according to Paalu’s life.

Paalu wanted to manifest the idea of a cyclical lifetime, which is not necessarily arranged in the biological course of life where you are born, grow up to be an adolescent, get a partner, birth children, raise them, get old, die, and so on.
He thought the cyclical arrangement could be a display of the inner cycles, with no attachment to time but a connection to something more important.


The photographs used for life cycles are (as usual) taken from Paalu’s photo albums — yet this time, the photographs incite a wide range of actual emotions, real relationships, and true experiences.

This time he doesn’t bring you inside his head; he welcomes you to his life.

Life Cycles is undoubtedly his most personal piece yet, since the ghouls and psychosomatic expressions are put away, giving us a novel glimpse outside of his mind.

Yet his choice of material may also reflect that he is entering a new cycle where he lets go of his demons — whereas what remains is his vivid stars, intricate chaos, and himself.

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